Session information last updated 1-28-2020, subject to change without notice.

 
Major Sessions, Monday, March 30
 
 9:30 AM to
10:30 AM
Randolph 1BGeneralPresidents ExchangeDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Presidents Exchange - ASA PreK-12 GAISE 2 - Enhancing the Spirit of School Level Statistics in GAISE 1
This session focuses on the Pre-K-12 Guidelines for Assessment and Instruction in Statistics Education (GAISE) Framework Report 2 unveiled April 2020. The original GAISE (published 15 years ago) has significantly impacted state, national, and international standards and policy. GAISE2 addresses the future essentials in statistics curriculum maintaining the spirit of GAISE1 across school levels with enhancements to changes in data types, types of data sets, technology, assessment, and the necessity of always questioning the data.

 

Lead Speaker: Christine Franklin

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerConstruct Impactful Mathematics Coaching

Coaching to Improve Teacher Questioning
Teachers ask many questions every day. How can coaches help teachers to use questioning effectively to improve student achievement? This session examines how teachers plan, ask, and reflect on their use of questions. Support teachers to focus on student thinking and use actions to ensure that students are the ones making sense of their strategies in solving problems. This session provides tools for coaching teachers to create environments where students do the sense making.

 

Lead Speaker: Edward Nolan

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Using a Variety of Media to Lead Courageous Conversations Among Mathematics Education Stakeholders
As change agents for ensuring that each and every student has access to a meaningful and relevant mathematics education, it is important that we are able to orchestrate courageous conversations around issues of equity and social justice among stakeholders. Participants will examine a variety of media that can be used as catalysts for courageous conversations around stereotypes and beliefs about particular groups of students and dangerous assumptions about their mathematics abilities. Strategies for conducting the conversations will also be discussed.

 

Lead Speaker: Marilyn Strutchens

 1:45 PM to
2:45 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationConstruct Impactful Mathematics Coaching

Guided Collaboration to Support Teachers in Number Talks: Insights and Challenges
In this session I'll share findings of a small study of two high school preservice teachers as they participated in ten cycles of guided collaboration to learn to implement Number Talks. With my support, the teachers collaborated in planning, teaching, observing each other's Number Talks, and reflecting on what they noticed. During the session, we'll watch videos of their planning and reflection meetings and discuss the biggest issues the teachers faced as they learned to elicit and support students' ideas. We'll also think together about the coach's role in guided collaboration.

 

Lead Speaker: Cathy Humphreys

 1:45 PM to
2:45 PM
Grand Ballroom BPk-2 PrimarySpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

The Power of Ideas: Letting Students' Thinking Take Center Stage
Do your students believe that they have important mathematical ideas? Do they believe that mathematics makes sense and is about more than answers? Do you believe that students' ideas should be at the center of the classroom?  We'll explore routines and strategies for eliciting, valuing, and leveraging students' ideas in the PreK-2 classroom (and beyond!) and discuss why monitoring for sense-making is your most important job.

 

Lead Speaker: Annie Fetter

 3:00 PM to
4:00 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Building Capacity in Statistics and Mathematical Modeling
With the rise of data science and interdisciplinary professions, the quantitative, computational and communication skills needed in the workforce are growing.  This requires ongoing professional development to help teachers engage students in mathematical modeling and statistics in ways that teachers may not have experienced as students or in their preparation programs.  To facilitate new practices in their classrooms, teachers need ongoing support, which can be provided through the powerful combination of professional development and learning communities.  The Mathematical Association of America has developed several National Science Foundation (NSF) funded national-scale professional development mechanisms to build evidence-based teaching practices within professional learning communities.   Through an institutional NSF grant, I have also partnered with a school district to build teacher-led professional development in mathematical modeling for elementary school teachers.   I'll introduce several of these programs and emphasize elements that led to sustained success and growth both of the professional development effort and of the community-building.

 

Lead Speaker: Rachel Levy

 3:00 PM to
4:00 PM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

Utilizing Math History to Embrace Equity, Failure, and Authentic Problem Solving in Leadership Communities
The history of mathematics is a rich reservoir of alignment to the some of the deepest goals of math education's future. Drawing on contributions, development, and problems from various cultures/races/societies, participants will examine the most compelling and binding narrative of mathematics--that its progress is rooted in failure and within a domain of time that is much wider than is honored in current classrooms. In order for math educators and all its stakeholders to truly have empathy for students, who must learn new math content/ideas everyday, they themselves must be doing mathematics that results in irresolution and welcome this general inevitability of mathematics with honesty and alacrity. Successful learning of mathematics is embedded in failure and time. Not only is there ample evidence of that in the history of mathematics, the history of math education also serves as a beacon for such pedagogy. As such, there will also be book and curriculum references from the last 50 years that speak to this alignment. Participants will leave this presentation with invigorating resources and problems to share with their communities and continue the discussions that highlight culturally responsive curriculum design.

 

Lead Speaker: Sunil Singh

 4:15 PM to
5:15 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

How Mathematicians Play: Creating a Culture of Ownership, Rigor, and Joy in Math Class
Play is one of the most effective ways to explore new contexts and make connections. Still, play without boundaries won't help us to achieve our teaching goals. We need to develop structures and strategies to connect meaningful exploration and develop true mathematical understanding. This session will focus on concrete methods to marry play and rigor in math class. Using conjectures and counterexamples, classroom openers, and other routines, we can build a classroom culture that motivates students to think more deeply and take ownership of their own mathematical learning.

 

Lead Speaker: Daniel Finkel

 4:15 PM to
5:15 PM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Six Essential Expectations for Effective Mathematics Instruction
Productive leaders must know what to look for and promote in mathematics instruction. Explore six essential expectations for effective mathematics instruction that emphasize the mathematical practices and the content they support with the purpose of increasing student achievement for each and every learner. Develop a plan for communicating these expectations to parents, teachers, and administrators.   "Focus, coherence, and rigor" has been emphasized with a considerable amount of push back from parents, the media, and even teachers and administrators. Why? Part of the response could be due to the order in which they are presented. Rather than discussing "focus, coherence, and rigor" this session will describe the need to present the three as "coherence, rigor, and focus." The order matters.   Coherence is teaching with connections within topics and grades as well as across them. Rigor is the need to have a balance of concepts, procedures, and applications with concepts introduced first and then connected to procedures in explicit ways. For coherence and rigor to be accomplished, the curriculum must be focused as teaching for coherence and rigor takes time.   When these three components are in place the setting is right to support the six essential expectations for effective mathematics instruction. The six expectations are to: teach with coherence, lead with concepts, stay focused, emphasize reasoning, facilitate perseverance, and support practices. Mathematics education leaders must generate a plan for sharing these expectations with parents, teachers, and administrators. The plan needs to include a way to create a shared vision of classrooms where these expectations are in place. Classroom video will be used as a means to accomplish this goal. Video must be carefully selected so that all stakeholders can make sense of each of the expectations. All aspects are crucial in providing access to equitable instruction.   This session provides a window into the importance of these six essential expectations along with how to support their acceptance by stakeholders.

 

Lead Speaker: Juli Dixon

 
Major Sessions, Tuesday, March 31
 
 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Commit to a Strong Induction Program for your New Teachers - Construct a Structure for Every Learners Success
New teachers have barely scratched the surface of what they know about teaching.  Their preparation programs are vastly different. The variations in their previous classroom experiences are extreme. What knowledge and skills are missing? What do they know and understand about equity? Come discuss the needs for a strong induction program that is foundational for success in the classroom. What components must each program Include?   We'll continue by sharing strengths from participants' programs.

 

Lead Speaker: Connie Schrock

 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Randolph 1B9-12 High SchoolPresidents ExchangeDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Presidents Exchange - AMATYC Creating a lasting conversation between mathematics teachers in high school, community college, and university
This presentation will discuss a model that is used by a unified school district, a local community college, and a local university to facilitate conversations between their mathematics teachers. The mathematics faculty meet three to four times a year to discuss expectations of their students, placement requirements, dual enrollment courses, university and community college curriculum, transfer issues, and institutional updates.

 

Lead Speaker: Kathryn Kozak

 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

Why Are There Still Elephants in the (Mathematics Class-) Room?
Why are there still elephants in the mathematics classroom? These "elephants" often present roadblocks to students' engagement and learning. Such elephants might include the following: 1. Inaccurate and unfounded conceptions about girls learning mathematics 2. Inaccurate and unfounded conceptions about students of color learning mathematics 3. Missed opportunities for secondary students to learn from hands-on experience 4. Reliance on memorization and procedures to "do" mathematics 5. Using "let me show you how to do it" as a primary method of teaching The presenter will integrate experiences, research, and classroom video to examine related points and provide challenges for changing the narrative to release the elephants from the mathematics classroom.

 

Lead Speaker: Thomasenia Adams

 10:00 AM to
11:00 AM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Bold Mathematics Leadership: Create a culture of continuous improvement using NCSM Leadership Essential Actions
Every mathematics leader is charged with forging a path leading to improved student learning through meaningful commitments to those they serve. What does it take to live a courageous and bold mathematics leadership life?  Through examples, Mona will explore the second guiding principle of the newly released Framework for Mathematics Leadership. Walk away with bold leadership strategies to empower a culture of productive professionalism and continuous improvement.

 

Lead Speaker: Mona Toncheff

 10:00 AM to
11:00 AM
Grand Ballroom BPk-2 PrimarySpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

See it, Move it, Grasp it: Math with Virtual Manipulatives
Manipulatives are important tools that help young mathematicians make sense of complex mathematical ideas. Technology provides opportunities for students to engage with virtual manipulatives alongside or in place of concrete ones, but what changes and what stays the same when students "drag and drop" instead of pick up and place? In this session, we will discuss opportunities and limitations of virtual manipulatives using a free virtual manipulatives app - bring your own device!

 

Lead Speaker: Christine Newell

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Columbus HGeneralPresidents ExchangeDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Presidents Exchange - NCTM Catalyzing Change: Initiating Critical Conversations in Mathematics Teaching and Learning
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics formed three writing teams at the early childhood/elementary, middle school, and high school levels with the intent to initiate the critical conversations needed to address issues in school mathematics. The Catalyzing Change series focuses on recommendations in school mathematics with the purpose of initiating critical conversations for improving mathematics teaching and learning in school mathematics. This session will focus on initiating critical conversations based on the key recommendations from the Catalyzing Change series.

 

Lead Speaker: Robert Q. Berry, III

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Roosevelt 3BGeneralPresidents ExchangeDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Presidents Exchange - TODOS Influencing the Culture that Marginalizes Our Children
It falls upon educators to be activist on behalf of our children. The system that we know and are comfortable in does not work for our children.   The exclusive culture is deeply ingrained and inequities are unrecognizable.  Let's spend some time together reflecting on how we can influence this culture.  How can we be a catalyst for a change of hearts and minds?

 

Lead Speaker: Diana Ceja

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Starting with Me: Transforming Mathematics Education from the Inside Out
How might we transform the organizations we serve by first transforming ourselves? In order to lead mathematics education forward, we must understand ourselves as leaders and learners, including our strengths, preferences, blind spots, and limitations. Without attending to these aspects of our leadership personas, we are likely to limit or undermine our professional effectiveness. In this session, we'll explore how to effectively transform ourselves in order to transform mathematics education in our spheres of influence.

 

Lead Speaker: B. Michelle Rinehart

 11:15 AM to
12:15 PM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

Where Am I in My Equity Walk? Where will you be in 2025?
How might we improve the teaching and learning of mathematics for each and every student?  Mathematics Education Through the Lens of Social Justice: Acknowledgment, Actions, and Accountability (NCSM/TODOS, 2016), calls for "mathematics teachers and leaders to take multiple actions to create and sustain institutional structures, policies, and practices that lead to just and equitable learning opportunities, experiences, and outcomes for children." Join us as we reflect and discuss key actions to deepen and sustain your equity work.

 

Lead Speaker: John Staley
Co-Presenter: Julia Aguirre

 2:15 PM to
3:15 PM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

Powerful Moments in Math Class: Why Certain Experiences Stand Out and How We Create More of Them
As teachers, we want our lessons to leave a long-lasting impression on students. When we understand the psychology behind memories, we can use that knowledge to design powerful moments for our students. According to Heath and Heath (2018) memorable positive experiences contain one or more of the following elements: elevation, insight, pride, and connection. We will learn how to leverage each of these elements in math class to create meaningful and memorable experiences for all students.

 

Lead Speaker: Mike Flynn

 2:15 PM to
3:15 PM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

The new culture code: Simplifying the complex rules of change!
We can simplify the complex problem of systemic change through a relentless culture code that values: Improving the emotional impact of every teacher, leading the respectful treatment of every teacher of mathematics, and leading through a simple set of rules that stimulate complex, collaborative and intricate behaviors benefiting students.The teachers you lead can solve extremely complex probelms using just a few rules of thumb. In this actively engaged session, we discover and discuss those rules!

 

Lead Speaker: Timothy Kanold

 
Major Sessions, Wednesday, April 1
 
 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Michigan 39-12 High SchoolPresidents ExchangeBuild Mathematical Capacity

Presidents Exchange - AMTE The Five Practices in Practice: Successfully Orchestrating Mathematics Discussions in your High School Classroom
There are many challenges that teachers face when facilitating productive mathematics discussions in high school, including identifying meaningful mathematical goals and rich tasks, launching a task in ways to provide students with a path to success, and supporting students as they individually and collaboratively make sense of the mathematical ideas. This session will provide teachers and leaders with strategies for orchestrating productive discussions in high school classrooms in ways that support all students' mathematical learning.

 

Lead Speaker: Michael Steele
Co-Presenter: Margaret Smith
Co-Presenter: Miriam Sherin

 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

Talk Number 2 Me: Mathematics & Mindfulness
What is school for? To educate? Do we draw out students' talents and passion for mathematics? Social-Emotional Intelligence is the key component to engendering formidable mathematical learning. Dynamic Mindfulness is a trauma-informed mindfulness program that strengthens students' identities as sense-makers and problem solvers. Let's examine how the TRU Framework and Emotional Intelligence will build powerful mathematical identities and master the Standards of Mathematical Practice.

 

Lead Speaker: Christina Lincoln-Moore

 8:15 AM to
9:15 AM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerConstruct Impactful Mathematics Coaching

Why Be A Lucky Coach, When You Can Be A Great Coach?
Too often we leave things to chance. Learn how to become a proactive leader by experiencing the Decision-Making Protocol for Mathematics Coaching. Guide leaders through complex choices as they work with audiences of individual teachers, teams, and administrators. Increase your impact by developing an agenda that balances your school context with NCTM Math Teaching Practices. Ensure equity by developing your ability to have courageous conversations to address contextual factors and respond to diverse student backgrounds.

 

Lead Speaker: Courtney Baker
Co-Presenter: Melinda Knapp

 9:30 AM to
10:30 AM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

Building Thinking Classrooms
We know that problem solving is an effective way for students to learn to think mathematically and to acquire deep knowledge and understanding of the mathematics they are learning. Simply problematizing the mathematics curriculum, however, does not help constitute the practice that teachers want or students need. Equally, infusion of problem-based learning into the mathematics curriculum does not help with the transformations we want to see in our classrooms. What we need are a set of practices that, along with good problems, can build thinking classrooms. In this presentation, Dr. Peter Liljedahl looks at a series of such practices, emerging from 15 years of research, that can help to build an environment conducive to problem-based learning. He will unpack his research that has demonstrates that a problem-based learning environment and culture can quickly be established, even in classrooms where students resist change.

 

Lead Speaker: Peter Liljedahl

 9:30 AM to
10:30 AM
Grand Ballroom BGeneralSpotlight SpeakerConstruct Impactful Mathematics Coaching

Targeted coaching for equitable teaching practices: activities to develop four essential teaching strategies
Ensuring every teacher develops equitable teaching practices requires targeted and sustained coaching. Start by focusing on high-leverage teaching moves that engage every student in meaningful mathematics. Next, leverage the repeatable nature of instructional routines that incorporate those moves to regularly coach mathematics content and teaching. In this session learn how to coach around four high leverage teaching strategies inside an instructional routine so that every student can come to expect a high-quality learning experience.

 

Lead Speaker: Grace Kelemanik
Co-Presenter: Amy Lucenta

 10:45 AM to
11:45 AM
Grand Ballroom BK-5 ElementarySpotlight SpeakerBuild Mathematical Capacity

Lost in Translation: From Writers' Workshop to Leveled Math Groups
In K--5, we often take ideas from literacy and apply them to math. Sometimes that works well, e.g., sensemaking strategies for story problems. Sometimes, however, we oversimplify an approach, losing its power and purpose. In this session, we'll look at grouping formats used in elementary math today (such as math workshop or guided math) through this lens. What were the original ideas? What have they morphed into? What does that transformation mean for students?

 

Lead Speaker: Tracy Zager

 10:45 AM to
11:45 AM
Grand Ballroom A & C NorthGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

This is Us! Connecting Mathematics to Life Experiences
The tiniest events in our lives impact who we become. Each of us has a story - a story that could be used to facilitate the teaching of mathematics with real-world application.  To nurture the desire for students to learn and educators to diversify mathematics instruction, we have to think outside of the box.  Participants will learn how to support the design of clear, well-organized mathematical tasks reflective of best practices and appropriate for diverse learners.

 

Lead Speaker: Brea Ratliff

 1:45 PM to
2:45 PM
Columbus CDEFGeneralSpotlight SpeakerDesign Systemic Structures within the Mathematics Education Community

Blunt Observations and Practical Strategies for Orchestrating Far More Impactful PD in Mathematics
It is clear that what passes for PD of teachers of mathematics is seriously underperforming.  Rarely does typical PD change teacher knowledge or classroom practice, which is why it so rarely improves student achievement.  This session will take a careful look at why this is so and how we need to make accessible but radical changes in what passes for PD and what has a much more likely chance of improving student achievement.

 

Lead Speaker: Steve Leinwand

 1:45 PM to
2:45 PM
Columbus IJKLGeneralMajor PresentationBuild Mathematical Capacity

Creating Interesting Ways for Students to be Right and Wrong
Correct math depends on right answers. But meaningful math celebrates both right and wrong answers, allowing students to intrepidly explore and express their reasoning in varied and interesting ways. In this session, we'll examine high- and low-tech ways for teachers to celebrate diverse work and build on student thinking in every form.

 

Lead Speaker: Eli Luberoff

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